Business Travel and Golf

 

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It’s under two hours to get from Fredericton, NB to the beautiful shores on the Bay of Fundy in St. Andrews By the Sea, NB.

Business Travel and Golf

It is now customary for me to tag along a day or two when traveling for business to get in some golf and tick another great course off my Canadian golf bucket list.  My approach is consistent.  I’ve done this already this year in British Columbia and Alberta.  Here is my itinerary from a recent trip to New Brunswick to share my planning process:

Finishing work at 4:00 pm gave me 28 hours before flying home.  This window of time allowed me to get to the airport, rent my car, drive to my destination, check into my hotel, eat dinner, sleep, wake up, grab breakfast and get to the course.  After the round, I would grab lunch, quickly tour town and drive 90 minutes back to the airport.  28 hours created some purposefulness but the trip never felt rushed.  Besides, it’s hard not to relax when you’re in maritime Canada.

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The famous 12th hole (as seen up from the left of the green) at the Algonquin Resort Golf Club.  If this won’t help you relax after two days of business then nothing will.

Here are my tips and golf travel essentials to help you make the most of your next trip.

  1. Golf course access – the focus of your pre/post trip is golf so make sure you can access the course(s) you’d like to play before committing further. Easiest thing to do is to contact the course and ask if there is tee time availability on the date/window of time you’re planning to play.  Stating you’re from away and coming in as a single helps them understand your situation and can avoid surprises for you (perhaps the day you plan to arrive is the day after aeration of the greens, or worse, they are hosting some charity event and while there are tee times the first one is too late for you).  In some cases it may open up access you may not otherwise get access to.  Calling Algonquin resort in advance allowed me to access the earliest tee time available on my day of play which helped considerably.

 

  1. Know the fixed variables – Being clear on when work ends and when the flight home are the two most critical factors. I seek to ensure I have a window of time that is realistic.  Car rental agencies are generally much more flexible than airlines (Unless you’re willing to pay) but any significant changes to the itinerary could help you by calling them in advance.  As for variables beyond your control, do give consideration to the weather forecast on the day you want to play and pack accordingly.  And always have a toque in the golf bag.

 

  1. Accommodation – My philosophy on accommodation revolves around convenience and price, (with a caveat of some standard of cleanliness and user satisfaction). I like researching prices on an aggregator site and tend to use the same one to accumulate frequent user rewards (after using the site 10 times I get a free stay).  I like reputable chains but am willing to try a quaint place that receives great reviews.

 

  1. Golf Clubs – There are two camps here – to rent or to travel with your clubs. I personally prefer to travel with my clubs and as a result there are three golden rules: lock your golf travel bag; use a Club Glove stiff arm (or reasonable facsimile) and don’t skimp on your golf travel bag.  If you’re comfortable renting then consider these three rules: bring your own golf shoes, glove and a small bag of balls, tees, etc.; research in advance about the rental club options as some courses have two levels of rentals; and lastly, be accepting.  You chose not to bring your new driver so don’t get frustrated when you get a model of club you don’t prefer.

 

  1. Transportation – for me, it’s usually a vehicle rental. I love driving and find it relaxing.  Here, again, loyalty can pay off with rewards offered at most outlets.  Airport rentals are generally processed faster and their vehicles are newer.  One important item is to map your route and budget for some extra time in the event of unexpected traffic issues.  My buddies swear by an app called Waze to get you somewhere as quick as possible.  Last, sure you’re in a rush to leave and get to the course but take the time to get the seat and mirrors properly adjusted…and if possible to sync up your smartphone so you can enjoy some travel tunes.
  2. Keepsakes – I’ve practically walked from the rental car to the first tee (with a quick check in) but I always try to make some time afterward to check the pro shop. I love pin flags and also collect golf balls and markers with the course emblem on them.  Of course, the sale rack can unlock some great value too.   Here is a good alternative to airport shopping for those at home (especially if they like golf)

 

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Took a break from my pint of Picaroons and my Lobster Roll to capture this fiery sky.

 

  1. Food – this is one area I stretch the budget. My affinity for seafood and a          willingness to ask and try local favourites means I avoid fast food and seek out local flavours.  Trip Advisor and Yelp allows me to filter user satisfaction with food types.  Sometimes it’s a pub, other times finer dining.  Food is often part of the experience for me.  I’ve traveled with people who would eat on the cheap and spend more for accommodation (meaning they’re comfortable eating McDonalds but want the assurance of a high end place to stay).  Make your own determination and know what’s important.  It is always ideal when you can get both.  When I have time, I actually like to eat at the course before or after a round.  Many courses create a dining experience that rivals their golf experience.

 

  1. Pictures – As a rule I get to a course with close to 100% battery power on my phone to allow me to take pictures. I advise playing partners I’ll be taking some pictures for my blog so as to manage their expectation.  I keep the phone in my left pocket for easy access as I seek to minimize the impact on pace of play.

 

  1. Manage expectation – The number one goal of golf while traveling on business should be fun; you’re playing a course you may not otherwise access to. Shooting a high score, especially if you’re using rental clubs, should be irrelevant and not keep you from having fun.  Besides, maybe the rental putter is the magic club you’ve been seeking for years (take a picture and note the make and model…that’s why e-Bay was created!).  Smile and enjoy the fact you’re on the course.

 

  1. Be a good visitor – I always seek business cards from the courses I play. In many cases, upon learning I am a blogger with journalist accreditation they welcome the chance to host a guest reviewer.  I like to extend thanks to courses for allowing me access to their course.  My philosophy is simple: the currency of my blog is the relationships I am able to cultivate.  I sincerely appreciate the chance to experience their home course and want to let them know that.

 

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A most appropriate place to eat in St. Andrews.  The Lobster Roll did not disappoint.

Lastly, and perhaps most important, is to budget for the side trip.  I set funds aside throughout the year to allow me to tack on the day or two and enjoy a guilt-free and pleasurable experience without impacting the bottom line.  With a flight covered from work, the additional expenses create value, help me experience great golf across Canada and help make a significant dent in my bucket list.

 

The chance to have played golf in 8 provinces now has taught me a few things about business travel and golf.  I know I am not alone.  I’d welcome hearing your tips for maximizing golf experiences on business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Competitive Golf – Call Me Addicted

Competitive Golf – Call Me Addicted

A two-day provincial public player tournament in late August was only my second foray into formal competitive play.  Member-guest experiences (mine anyway), while competitive, are a little more casual in their structure and feel.  My first competitive golf experience was in 2011, similar event as this.  Golf Ontario is my provincial association and is formally affiliated with Golf Canada.  The event has all the formality of any event you’d expect; there is formal communications, a draw based on flights determined by the skill of the entrants, registration, a scorer’s tent, even a hand written score board and a starter who calls each player by name and city to the first tee.  I loved it.

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Competitive golf events are also sponsor supported.  Baka Wireless is the title sponsor for Golf Ontario’s Public Player tournament.

Playing of a 10.6 index at the time of registration I was in the C Flight, which meant I was in the lowest third of the almost 99 entries and were able to play from a course about 6300 yards and in a format that is Gross scoring (which is my score minus my index which is factored according to the slope rating of the course).  For me, this meant I got 12 strokes deducted a round.  I hadn’t exactly been lighting it up this summer; in fact, my game has regressed from June until now where I simply had not been able to score well.  I was getting loose off the tee and a mid-August lesson with CPGA professional Brian McCann from Brampton GCC set me on track and unleashed a new confidence I had not felt in some time.

A late summer move from Mississauga to Burlington had derailed my plans for regular summer play and practice so I entered the event with modest expectation (meaning none).  My only three goals were to have fun, focus on each and every shot, and accept the fact that over 36 holes there will be some loose shots.  After all, there’s a reason I am in C flight.  The event was hosted at DiamondBack Golf Club in Richmond Hill, Ontario.  The course in managed by ClubLink which is the same course conglomerate which controls Glen Abbey (home of the RBC Canadian Open).  Conditions were ideal and with a late morning tee time on the first day I felt prepared and had a quiet calm, dare I say confidence.

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A selfie in the late morning heat at DiamondBack Golf Club.

With a game plan off the tee, I started strong and carded a respectable 87 on round one which netted me at +3 and T-9 in my flight of 30.  With inverted tee times on Day 2, our flight was off first and my play afforded me a humane tee time.  Again, I played to a deliberate plan focusing on putting the ball in play off the tee.  I putted much better and scored an 82.  Overall, I finished T-5 with a two day net total of +1.

Golf Ontario ran a first class event.  The staff and volunteers were amazing and very helpful and supportive to all the players.  I’m already flagging the time in my calendar for next year.  Yes, after a fun two days of competitive play I am completely hooked.

In closing, I have never played golf with such a deliberate cadence.  From pre shot thinking, to attempted execution and complete acceptance I have no regrets about my approach.  Much advice I received from people I know focused on fun and purposeful routine.  Mission accomplished.  I’d love to hear about your competitive golf experiences and how you managed your play.  From my first event in 2011, I was able to mature on the course and play better, smarter and more fun golf.  After all, this does not affect my tour earnings of world golf rankings, but I did try my best, smile a lot and savour each second.

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The handwritten master scoreboard is a great touch.  Makes the event seem very official.  Great work, Golf Ontario.

I wish I could do this more regularly.  I know there are options through the GolfChannel AM Tour and the GTA AM Golf Tour.  But my combination of being loyal and value conscious, I think I’ll wait to 2017 for the Golf Ontario Public Players.  I can’t wait!

Stewart Creek – Mining for Birdies in Canmore

Course Reviews – Stewart Creek – Mining for Birdies in Canmore

http://www.stewartcreekgolf.com/

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A strong opening hole.  Love the elevation change to the fairway below.

The drive from Banff is a surprisingly short one – only about 15 minutes – so quick that I was extremely early for my afternoon tee time.  Following a hospitable reception, easy check in process and a light lunch I decided to pack the cart and tee off early as a single in hope of avoiding some inclement weather which was forecast.  First impressions at Stewart Creek are impressive.  The course is easy to locate off the Trans Canada and the clubhouse and pro shop are beautiful and very well stocked.  While I did not make the time to enjoy the patio, it shows off the facilities and the natural setting most beautifully.  Stewart Creek is recognized within Canadian Golf Magazine as a Top 100 Course in the country (ranked 57th in 2015) and rightfully so.  However, amidst the riches of great golf in the Canadian Rockies it is, dare I say, somewhat understated.  What I experienced is mountain golf which was playable for people of all skill levels, possessing the natural beauty which one would expect from golf in the Rockies and some strong design features which make for a memorable, challenging and very enjoyable golfing experience.

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The front nine presents so much beauty

Playing as a single and with a healthy gap between groups the starter took some extra time to impart some local knowledge, let me know when to have my camera ready and also to remind me I am in bear country.  He also shared a little of the history of the area and its mining history which I would see evidence of later on the course.  The first hole will grab player’s attention as this medium length par 4 plays to a dramatic drop to a wide landing area.  I made a smart decision to play a relaxed tee box of just under 6200 yards.  The front nine is more expansive that the back and I quickly appreciated having a cart as the climb between some holes is more than I’d care to experience on foot, following a morning 18 and set in bear country.

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Stewart Creek demonstrates a commitment to engage players of all skill levels with Family Tee options, making the game playable for all ages

I was very impressed that Stewart Creek invokes a Family Tee system which essentially allows player’s opportunity to access the course from yardages ranging from 100 – 250 for each hole.  You will not see this on the scorecard but it does add a unique way to engage players – young and old.  I’ve experienced this before and applaud courses for their efforts with alternative tee boxes to make the game more inclusive.

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An impressive close to the opening nine.

The course is designed by Canadian, Gary Browning.  He did add some impressive design features to create some memorable golf holes.  I was quite struck with the par 5 6th hole, which has the green set lower left from the fairway and broken off from the fairway with grasses and a couple trees.  The 9th hole, a majestic par 3 drops players down from the steady ascent throughout the front.  In researching the course, this is a change from the original design which had the 9th hole as a par 4, and one seemingly well received by players.  The green is guarded by a solitary shallow bunker and water on either side.  The course has very few bunkers, actually and uses subtle changes in terrain to protect the greens.  This again, in my opinion, makes the course more playable and enjoyable.

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Stewart Creek shows how playable mountain golf can be.

The back nine is less extreme in terms of elevation changes and continues to provide players stunning vistas to the surrounding mountains and the course itself, which has been recognized as a certified Audubon sanctuary back in 2004.  The course provides a feel of solitude and is not at all crowded in its design.  I was impressed with the consistently excellent condition of the course.  Greens were fair and rolled true.  The most difficult green is located on my favourite hole, the par 4, 14th.  On this short, drivable par 4, the long, multi-tiered green brings significant slope. Avoiding three putts if you’re on the wrong tier is challenging.  Set to the left of the 14th fairway is an abandoned coal mine entrance with a plaque to recognize its history.

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My favourite hole, the short par 4, 14th.

If I had two recommendations, it would be for Stewart Creek to dedicate a page on its website to telling more of the history of mining in this region and the story of transformation from mining to golf (which I understand required some significant work by the course to reinforce parts which had mining tunnels set below).  The second recommendation mirrors the first, in that Stewart Creek can speak more to its environmental stewardship and leadership.  Audubon certification is significant and represents a commitment to the environment which many players appreciate.  Both provide a unique story to engage golfers and I certainly wanted to learn more – both before and after playing there.

 

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The history of this region comes alive with this abandoned mine entrance.

The course ends on an enjoyable par 4-3-5 stretch and my round ended far too quickly for my liking.  Stewart Creek is nestled in a part of Canada which boasts an embarrassment of riches when it comes to publicly accessible golf.  I enjoyed my experience at Stewart Creek.  For a mountain course, it brings a high playability factor to it and with multiple tee decks offers access and enjoyment for all golfers.  I look forward to my next visit!

Aura – 7.5 out of 10 – Perhaps it is being part of a regional cluster of nationally recognized great courses, perhaps it is simply a humble and modest approach to communication.  Whatever it is, it deserves a higher score.

Value (cost / experience) – 7.5 out of 10 – I really enjoyed my golfing experience and would happily come back and pay the peak fee.  But make no mistake; golfing in the Rockies is not for the frugal golfer.  The website offers fees which range based on the time of year and time of day you play and within these there are greater value options on their website.  But for a top 100 course in the country, set in the Rocky Mountains, and with a strong layout, the value here is more than fair.

Course Condition (fairways/greens, layout) – 9 out of 10 – The course is exceptionally maintained.  Tee boxes, fairways, and greens are all consistent and outstanding. There are very few bunkers but they are consistent in how they play.  The quality of the course allows the player to enjoy themselves and focus on their game…and the stunning vistas.  It was my first experience with a Browning design and I was impressed.

Overall Experience (how did the round make me feel; would I return) – Hitting it straight off the tee is not a hallmark of my game.  Making a decision to play off a shorter tee deck allowed me to focus more on my first experience playing golf in Canmore.  But the course is very playable; not too tight or penal.  I really enjoyed the course.  Add to it the people, who were very friendly and helpful, and it capped off a memorable round of golf. – 8.5 out of 10

Highlight (what is great about the course) – With consistently quality golf throughout, I like the boldness of the design.  The first hole is impressive in its drop off and reflects the vastness and impressive mountain range to the north.  As discussed, the 6th hole is so unique and the 9th, like the first, is great to experience.  But boldness like the family tees, the solitary tree on the 13th fairway, and the great challenge of my favourite hole, the 14th, helps to captivate golfers and bring them back.  And make no mistake, I plan to be back.

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My experience at Stewart Creek ended too quickly.  It’s a mountain golf experience I look forward to experiencing again.

 

 

A new look for 36aday

While I don’t pretend to have formal education and training in communications, I have learned enough to value the importance of a clear and consistent brand.  Visual images can do much to present a brand to people.  36aday is over two years old now and I realized some time back that I wanted to step up the way in which I present myself and this emerging brand.  My engagement in a regular Tuesday evening #GolfChat on Twitter connected me with a digital communications professional who has extensive experience with the golfing community.  Herb McNally (@McTwentyTwo) was a logical choice for me to work with.  He brings technical skill, strong communications and an understanding of golf branding.  The process was relatively quick, easy and iterative.  I shared my philosophy, background around my work, and the central imaging I was hoping to incorporate.  The final product you see as my Twitter avatar is the result of the third iteration of images.

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I can go on and on about the process, value and pleasure it was to work with Herb.  He is a real pro.

But I am most proud of having a brand images that reflect the central aspects of my interests in writing – golf and golf travel in Canada.  Over the next few months I intend to incorporate some of these images directly onto my blog site and into new materials like letterhead and business cards.  I may take this a little further and make myself a couple hats but I’d really welcome hearing from you about what you think of this new visual branding.  Keeping the look within either red or green will allow me to focus in season (green) or off season (red).  All together, I have almost 20 files to choose from and for different purposes.

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Thank you all for your support of my work.  I have some more exciting plans to bolster my blog site over the coming year or two and would like to expand my writing efforts to share insight on golf travel within Canada.  For now, this is a big step and one I am extremely proud to share with you.

Banff Springs – Breathtaking Golf in the Rockies

Banff Springs – Breathtaking Golf in the Rockies

http://www.fairmont.com/banff-springs/golf/

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Another beautiful morning at Banff Springs

One does not have to look very far to locate Fairmont Banff Springs Golf Course on top course ranking lists in Canada.  Arguably one of Stanley Thompson’s finest works, this course set adjacent to the iconic Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel and the majestic Bow River.  The golf course is majestic, the views expansive and powerful with the river and the mountains providing a stunning backdrop.  It may well feature the greatest opening nine I have experienced and possesses signature hole after signature hole.  Both Canadian Golf Magazine and SCOREGolf place this course well within their top 10 in Canada.

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Looking back from behind the second green

On a cold spring morning, I was fortunate to tee off as a single where I could take my time, take lots of pictures and enjoy a true, unique golf experience.  The starter advised me holes which I should have my camera ready – 4 and 14.  He may well have said all 18 of them.  After the opening hole, the course faces the mountains and holes 2, 3 and 4 build in magnitude.  The 3rd hole is an underrated par 5, and if not for Thompson’s genius design of the 7th hole at Highlands Links, I would state this to be my favourite par 5 of any I’ve played.   However, the 4th hole is a breathtaking beauty, unlike any I’ve played.  A downhill par 3, aptly named Devil’s Cauldron, this hole is guarded by water in the front and classic Thompson bunkering protecting short and left of the green.  While admiring this bowl shaped design and readying to take my shot, a golf cart pulled up.  They were a touring the course, not golfers.  In asking if they would take my picture following my swing, the gentleman stated he’d be delighted and that he was a photographer.  I marveled at my fortune.  And to close off; my shot – witnessed by tourists both behind me as well as behind the green, the shot landed softly beyond the green and avoiding the traps.  I’ll never forget that.

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A picture I will always cherish – holding the finish on the famous 4th hole.

The course returns to the relatively new clubhouse after nine than moves toward the hotel where it loops around and back, allowing for a stretch of tree lined holes and stout par 3’s before returning back in a more expansive stretch alongside the mountains.  The effort it must have taken back in the 1920’s to build this course is staggering to imagine.  The course offers something for so many; historians, nature lovers and of course, golfers.

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Hard not to get distracted by the scenery

The tranquility of my clear, cold morning allowed me to play a relaxed round and appreciate the genius of Thompson who, once again, used the land exceedingly well.  There are no holes which are too close in proximity to others.  The back nine provides challenge in terms of length and demands a level of accuracy which is less prominent on the front nine.

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The 9th hole runs alongside the Bow River.

The conditioning of the course is fantastic, complementing the exceptional layout and natural setting.  A true bucket list course, this will not be your most inexpensive round.  But it is entirely possible that it may be your most memorable.

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The 14th hole shows the best view of the Banff Springs Hotel

Aura – 9.5 out of 10 – This is a national top 10 course and top 5 public course.  For many, it is their favourite course in the country and is entirely worthy of planning a trip around.  If blessed with a sunny day, your camera will get a strong workout.

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Value (cost / experience) – 8 out of 10 – Peak fees are $239 + tax.  There are afternoon and shoulder season rates but this will set back many players.  However, I acknowledge value is in the eyes of the beholder.  And for the quality and natural beauty of this course, the chance to play it once (in the shoulder season for me) makes this a solid value pick, not exceptional.  Understand, it’s a golfing experience and a true bucket list course.

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Even the practice facilities are stunning.

Course Condition (fairways/greens, layout) – 9 out of 10 –  Course staff were hard at work on the fairways, greens and even the bunkers while I was there in late May. The layout is brilliant, one of Thompson’s strengths, but the conditioning of the course complements the quality setting.  The tee boxes were in exceptional condition.  Greens rolled true and consistent, not too fast for a public resort course which helps ensure good pace of play.  The greenside protection was diverse and penal at times but never unfair.  Fairways were superb.

Overall Experience (how did the round make me feel; would I return) – 9.5 out of 10 – I would return in a heartbeat.  Understand that you’re in Banff and there is much else to do – hot springs, the town, the hotel – but the golf course stands on as an experience worthy of the investment and complements the scenery of this gorgeous town.

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Highlight (what is great about the course) – For the purposes of managing space, I’ll let the pictures speak to this.  Safe to say practically everything is great about it.

Recommendation (magic wand…what would I change) – aside from moving to Alberta to take advantage of a residents discount, there really isn’t anything specific I would change.  This is a truly special course and well worthy of its prominent places in national course rankings.  As a public play, it is on my top 3 list.

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One of my favourite images is this view of the par 5 3rd hole.

Just So You Know – Practice facilities are very strong.  There is also a 9 hole ‘Tunnel Mountain’ course available to complement the 18 hole Stanley Thompson course.

 

Proud to be a Snell Golf Canada Ambassador

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“Welcome to the Snell Golf Canada team”.

With that email from Snell Golf Canada marketing strategist, Bill Crowe, I was officially a brand ambassador for Snell Golf Canada. Snell golf balls are new to the Canadian golf scene and having tried them recently I was convinced they were the ball for me.  Here’s a link to my recent review.

You’ll see me striping the optic yellow Get Sum balls on courses across the country. The combination of performance, durability and colour are a winner for me. For players seeking a performance ball, you should try the My Tour Ball. Arguably as good or better than the leading balls on the market, experience these for yourself. Can’t decide?  Try the Testing Pack (6 of each to allow you decide what is best for you).

The Snell website shares much about the balls and the story of Dean Snell (which is a great story). Online ordering helps control costs; it’s all about the average golfer and equipping them (us) with a great ball at a great price.  The process is easy and the team is very responsive should you have questions.

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To help set you up, when you order online use the promo code ’36aday’ to get an additional $2 off per dozen. But the real value is in their 6 dozen value packs. Save on shipping with a value pack order. Add the promo code ’36aday6′ and get an amazing $12 off your order.

I want to extend my thanks to the entire team at Snell Golf Canada. Like many golfers, I am loyal and passionate about my equipment. Two rounds with Snell Golf balls made me pursue a permanent change. If we get a chance to tee it up together I’ll share a Snell for you to try. To me, my tag line for Snell Golf Balls are: Play. Better. Value.

See you on the course!

Oh, The Places You Will Go

Oh, The Places You Will Go

“You’re off to Great Places!
Today is your day!
Your mountain is waiting,
So… get on your way!”
Dr. Seuss, Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

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Dr. Seuss, golf and transformational figures are not topics I’d ever weave into a golf blog post.  Until now, of course.  The author a lighthearted series of children’s books weaves in messages for life for kids of all ages and within the book ‘Oh The Places You Will Go’ I was drawn to comparisons of  someone who I would argue to be the most passionate golfer I have ever met; ‘passionista’ is her term.

Tiffany Chaisson (@tiffchaisson) is active on twitter, loves the game of golf, travels the world, and now – two years into her golf journey – is a CEO of a not for profit to support kids playing golf by removing financial barriers to participate.  This is a new venture for Tiffany and her enthusiasm for Fairways may, (strong emphasis on may) even be more infectious than her love of playing the game.

We met this week for a round at the historic, iconic Ladies Club in Thornhill, ON for a round of golf with head professional Padraig Kelly.  Paddy hosted Tiff and I to a round and a tour of the clubhouse where we learned more about this history of this Stanley Thompson design which is built primarily for women players.  I will share more on the course in a future course review, but the experience we shared on a tranquil July morning is best reflected in this shot.  It is one of my all-time favourite golf pictures.

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Tiffany Chaisson showing her enthusiasm and an impressive vertical!  Love this image, it reflects a passion for the game we should all tap into more often.

Looking back, my reflections of my golfing journey made me appreciate the places I have gone.  And more importantly the people I have met.  New friends and acquaintances drawn together through a love of the game can only make you smile more on the course.  And, as Paddy was right to say, players tend to play better when they smile more.  Makes sense it was one of better rounds in some time.

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Paddy Kelly showing a solid club twirl after his approach on 17.

I will close off with this quote, as I reflect that my own golfing experience is certainly one of ‘fun to be done’!  Thanks for the gracious hospitality to Paddy Kelly and his team at Ladies GC.  And to Tiff, like Dr. Seuss, you have proven to be a transformative teacher.

“Oh the places you’ll go! There is fun to be done! There are points to be scored. There are games to be won. And the magical things you can do with that ball will make you the winning-est winner of all.”
Dr. Seuss, Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

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New friendships forged through golf.  Paddy, Tiff and I.